Rare tree species Trees and shrubs

The basis of all conservation measures is the documentation of existing forest genetic resources. In addition to widely spread species such as spruce, pine, oak and beech, there are also rare tree species in our forests. Tree species that take up less than one percent of the forest area are defined as "rare".

Common Yew

The yew (Taxus baccata L.) is considered to be endangered nationwide. This assessment is based above all on the regionally limited distribution of yew and its occurrence in small to moderate proportions in beech forest communities.

Wild Service Tree

The Wild Service Tree (Sorbus torminalis L.) is considered endangered throughout Germany. This assessment is based above all on the regionally limited distribution of the Wild Service Tree and its occurrence in small to moderate proportions in oak forest communities, which are often replaced by beech in the course of near-natural forest management.

Field maple

The field maple (Acer campestre L.) is regarded nationwide as endangered or rare. This assessment is based on the regionally limited distribution of the field maple and its occurrence in small to moderate proportions in oak forest communities, which are often replaced by beech in the course of near-natural forest management.

Downy oak

The down oak (Quercus pubescens Willd.) is a rare tree species in Germany, which is located here at the northernmost border of its natural, contiguous distribution area. Its population is endangered by beech and/or non-native species.

European Bird Cherry

The common grape cherry (Prunus padus L.) is not considered endangered in Germany. Due to its natural distribution area, however, the tree species is rarer in some parts of Germany than in other parts.

Grey alder

The grey alder (Alnus incana (L.) Monk) is not endangered in Germany. Due to the lack of river dynamics in the floodplain forests, however, the existing forests are changing more and more and developing into hardwood meadows. Therefore, the grey alder has less chance of survival there.

Green alder

The green alder (Alnus viridis (Chaix) D.C.) is not endangered in Germany.

Black poplar

The European black poplar (Populus nigra L.) is considered to be endangered nationwide. This assessment is based on the knowledge of the extensive habitat loss of softwood wetlands and the risk of hybridisation with foreign poplar species as well as the observation of dying phenomena on individual well-examined occurrences.

Service tree

The Speierling (Sorbus domestica L.) is considered as endangered in its continuance country widely. This assessment is based on the regionally limited distribution of Speierling and its occurrence in small to moderate proportions in oak forest communities, which are often replaced by beech in the course of near-natural forest management.

Elm species

The three native elm species - Flutter elm (Ulmus laevis Pall.), Mountain elm (Ulmus glabra Huds.) and Field elm (Ulmus minor Mill.) - are endangered nationwide. This assessment is primarily based on the effects of elm dying and the extensive habitat loss in the hardwood floodplains and wetlands.

Wild apple

The wild apple (Malus sylvestris (L.) Mill.) is an endangered tree species throughout Germany. The reasons for its rarity and endangerment lie in its weakness in competition with forestry tree species, which displaces it - also due to a lack of silvicultural support - from used forests in peripheral and extreme locations.

Wild pear

The wild pear (Pyrus pyraster (L.) Burgsd.) is endangered nationwide. The reasons for this rarity and endangerment lie in its weakness in competition with forestry tree species, which - also due to a lack of silvicultural support - displaces it from used forests in peripheral and extreme locations.